Women in Pakistan- Escape! (English)


For Women: Violence in Pakistan

Women in Pakistan do not have economic, social, civil and political rights. Women are denied the right to education, and also the right to control their marriage and divorce. Girls and women who are born into poverty and are sold as sex slaves.  They are also forced into marriage, prostitution or work exploitation such as bonded labor. This proves there is discrimination against women and girls in Pakistan.

Pakistani women endure domestic violence and physical abuse, which includes rape, acid throwing, burning, and “honor” killings.  This is still widespread in Pakistan. Acid-throwing is increasing. The government has not restricted the sale of acid.  It has not punished those who use it to injure women. “Honor” killings continue daily.

Women and girls are sold into sexual slavery.  Pakistan is a country of origin and a transit country for the selling of women for domestic labor, forced marriage and prostitution. This form of slavery is organized by crime networks that exist in all of South Asia. Both local and trafficked women are killed if they refuse to earn money in prostitution. Forced marriage of young girls continue. Even though slavery is illegal in Pakistan, girls and women continue to be traded to settle debts or conflicts. The sale of girls and women in markets is reported in underdeveloped or poor areas such as parts of Balochistan.

Physical abuse of women in police custody continues often in Pakistan. Despite promises of police reform, police continue to use torture to intimidate, harass and humiliate detainees.  They do this to extract money or information.

Almost no positive changes have taken place for women’s rights. The government in Pakistan still fails to provide enough protection for abused women in the custody of the state, and in the family and community. In fact, the number of victims of violence appears to have risen. There are very few laws to help women who are escaping honor killing and other domestic violence.  There is a lack of safe houses for women.  There is an absence of reliable laws to save women from parents who do not accept women’s rights to freedom of choice in marriage. There is an absence of reliable and prompt protection by the state.

This is not acceptable.

Even though some progress has been made, much remains to be done. More women are aware of their rights, thanks to the Pakistani women’s rights groups, working women, and the human rights movement.

However, the killers of Samia Sarwar  and many others remain free. ( http://www.amnestyusa.org/women  I apologize it is in English)

The Parliamentary act that was supposed to explicitly outlaw “honor” crimes did not pass. In one survey by the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan, it was reported that in the year 2000, almost 90 percent of women did not know they had the right to divorce.  This includes women who were highly educated!

The government of Pakistan has made general statements on the protection of women’s rights, including condemning “honor” crimes.  The Pakistan Council of Islamic Ideology was asked whether “honor” killings are lawful according to Islam. It replied in a letter in the year 2000

“Although sexual immorality is one of the major sins according to Islam for which Islam has prescribed very severe punishment, nobody is allowed to punish others on the behalf of this law. Willful homicide, no matter what the the motive, is the same as murder.”

However, legal and procedural changes have not occurred.  Human rights organizations are calling for repeal of laws that discriminate against women.  One example is the Zina Ordinance and the Evidence Act.  Another is the Qisas and Diyat law. This allows the family of a murder victim to forgive the perpetrator and save him from prosecution.

This is not acceptable.
If women are being killed by acid or are being forced into sexual slavery and marriage, then they need to escape Pakistan until the country accepts women’s rights.
.
This is a blog in English (again, I apologize) which is called Escape Pakistan:
It was written in the year 2009, so I do not know if the information is still good.  I will try to translate some of it, although the writer probably speaks Urdu if you message them over the internet:
Hello, reader!
 
The purpose of this blog is to list all the information required to escape Pakistan and pursue a dignified and secure life.
 
I have listed procedures I had to do to apply for my immigration. I got:
  1. Birth certificate
  2. Passport in Lahore
  3. Police certificate
  4. Driving license
  5. Notarizing documents
  6. Marriage certificate registeration
  7. Verification through Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Pakistan
  8. Degree validation through HEC
and more…
 
Some of the procedures I did not go through for them. I would add personal accounts from my close circle. These processes are applicable and valid for Lahore.
 
Also, you can contribute your story, which I would publish here, to assist more and more people.
 

Have a nice day.

How to get a Birth Certificate

Recommended Requirements:

1. Birth certificate form
2. Father’s NIC
3. Mother’s NIC
Your NIC would not be considered since birth certificate application is submitted on behalf of your parents.
NOTE: Make sure you were registered within a week of your birth. You need to verify that from your parents.
This registration date (Tareekh-e-Indraaj) is very very important. If this date does not exist in the Government’s database it is a problem. And for every problem there is a cost. So be prepared.
1. Go to your area’s Nazim office. (If you weren’t born in Cantt area) 2. Provide them with any of the above documents.
Cost: Rs. 1200/- (But a lower price like 800-900 is also a valid fee)
Time: Within a day or 2

Other:
1. Go to City Town Hall. The best place for all records and information. View Town Hall / City Hall in a larger map

Ask for directions under the pepal tree and person there would point you to the right person.
3. That person would collect all required documents, verify if your registration date exists in the computer records and inform you.
4. If all goes well, you will have your birth certificate in:
Cost: Rs. 1200/-
Time: 3-4 Days
NOTE: If registration date is not found, the cost would go up 2-3 times but it is still negotiable.
Following is what the birth certificate now looks like:

How to get a Police Character Certificate

Getting a police certificate in Lahore is amazingly easy and simple.
Here are simple steps:
Requirement:
1. 4 passport sized photographs
2. An application to SSP Police explaining where you intend to go, and all the address that you have lived. (this may be written by hand) 3. Valid Passport

4. NADRA National Identification Card
5. Police Certificate Form, available at SSP office STEP 1. Put your information on the Police Certificate Form and Go to SSP Office, Lahore. Location is near Government College, Lahore, Multan Road:

View SSP Office in a larger map

STEP 2. After entering the premises, turn right and proceed to a big room.

STEP 3. Give them the Police Certificate Form, photos, and application. The personal would give you 4-5 days time. That is the normal time and it can be reduced to 1 day if you have approach.

STEP 4. A police officer would visit you at your home in a few days (he might call before coming). He would fill Police Certificate Form by asking you questions.

STEP 5. Go to SSP office after 4-5 days, and go to the same room.

STEP 6. Find your application and get it stamped and submitted to a batch. This batch would appear in front of SSP Lahore.

STEP 7. Make a queue and go to SSP’s office, who would call your name and sign the certificate.

STEP 8. You have a Police Certificate for immigration.

How to get a Pakistani Passport

This post applies to Pakistani citizens residing in Lahore who have woken up soon enough to realize that escape is important.
 
Pakistani passport is now digitized . This means that unfortunate people like me who had old passport would be required to make it again. But there is no special route for people who have old passport.  The same process applies.
 
Things you need:
1. Around Rs. 3000/- cash.
2. Identification card with a few photocopies.
 
Here is the list of steps involved:
 
STEP 1) Around 9 in the morning proceed to Barkat Market in Garden Town as below:
 
 
Here you can find National Bank of Pakistan:
 
View National Bank, Barket Market in a larger map
Either
a) Find a bank guard outside giving empty forms to be filled and deposited on the booth outside. yes it is a long line!!!
Time: 10-15 Minutes
Cost: Rs. 2230 something passport fee + Rs. 70 (negotiable) agent fee = Rs. 2300
OR
b) Speak to an agent (men sitting on wooden benches) to get you the form and pay the dues while you sit in the shade.
Time: depending on the queue.
Cost: Rs. 2230 something passport fee
 
Get a stamped receipt which is valid for like 2-3 months.
 
Now you can either go home or move to the Passport office.
 
STEP 2) Passport office is located at the back of Himayat-e-Islam college for women in Garden Town, Lahore. It is a walking distance from National Bank or Barkat market. Car park is a big problem. I would recommend to park it in front of a college on the same road as passport office (oh and its free). Find the office location below:
 
View Passport Office in a larger map
 
Here you can:
 
Either
a. Show the police dude the receipt and enter the premises to find a queue to the right. Some part of the queue is in shade others are not so lucky.
OR
b. Find agents outside the premises. They can be found roaming rather stalking for clients or people sitting on benches. Agent would ask for Rs. 700+ (totally negotiable (recommended!) ) . Bargain, and whatever rocks your boat finalize. Time 15 minutes wait in your car or under shade in lush green park.
 
Output of step 2 should be a digital token. This token is everything do not loose this! This token would also have a date on which you have to visit passport office again.
 
STEP 3) At the passport office. Enter the premises and proceed straight forward into a big room with a lot of people. Luckily this room is air conditioned and have enough seats to get you seated. No agents are involved in this step but approach applies (if you have highly ranked someone at a highly ranked seat). Here everything goes in sequence. Your token number is called out and displayed (if I remember).
So the steps are simple 4 booths and you have to go through each of them, in sequence.
 
i. Get your fingers scanned.
ii. Get your digital photographed taken (yeah finally you dont need to take
those passport size photos)
iii. Get your demographics verified (vigilance is required there may be
discrepancies). This data is pulled from NADRA.
iv. Get a date from some officer. Don’t know why this booth exists. Nothing much to
do there just go the officer he sees you and assign a date to pick your
passport up.
 
Go home.
 
Whatever the date is mentioned to collect your passport there is a high (98%) chance it would be late 3-4 days. Mine was late a week and I found that out after 3 visits.
So you go the passport office on mentioned date + cushion days. Show the police dude your receipt. Enter the premises and move to the extreme right, past the queue getting tokens. There you would find a booth and some people already there claiming their passports. Passport would be handed out in batch of 10 so the sooner you initiate, if not already done, the batch the better. Batch would contain your receipt. And if your passport is ready you can collect it by showing you original ID card else they would assign you a new date.
 
There you go, you have your digital passport. Verify the information on in since sometimes it gets mis-printed.
 

This information is valid as of May 2009. I highly doubt there would have been any change in the process/system.

Categories: Articles In English, Indian/South Asian, Marriage/Monogamy, Murder, Patriarchy, Pragmatic Activism, Radical Feminism, Violence and Abuse | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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